Marco Fusinato. Mass Black Implosion (Shaar, Iannis Xenakis). 2012. Ink on archival facsimile of score; framed. Part one of five parts. To make these drawings Fusinato chose a point on the page and then ruled a line from every note in the composition back to that point. This ongoing series, initiated in 2007, is founded—literally overlaid—on the scores of pioneering avant-garde composers. In the works on view here, Fusinato has drawn on a score penned by the Greek composer Iannis Xenakis (1922–2001), whose groundbreaking post–World War II works were deeply informed by mathematical and architectural logic, and, later, by computer programming. Xenakis worked for more than a decade in the studio of the architect Le Corbusier, and he often composed with an existing architectural site in mind. Here Fusinato has used Xenakis's score in the same way—as a pre-existing space. This drawing and others in the artist's Mass Black Implosion series have an immense gravitational density, which seems to suggest that all the notes should be played at once. Fusinato's intervention thus shifts the scores away from Xenakis's original intention, collapsing linear/durational performance into simultaneity. (Photo and caption via moma.org)

Marco Fusinato. Mass Black Implosion (Shaar, Iannis Xenakis). 2012. Ink on archival facsimile of score; framed. Part one of five parts. To make these drawings Fusinato chose a point on the page and then ruled a line from every note in the composition back to that point. This ongoing series, initiated in 2007, is founded—literally overlaid—on the scores of pioneering avant-garde composers. In the works on view here, Fusinato has drawn on a score penned by the Greek composer Iannis Xenakis, whose groundbreaking post–World War II works were deeply informed by mathematical and architectural logic, and, later, by computer programming. The drawings have an immense gravitational density, which seems to suggest that all the notes should be played at once.  (Photo and caption via moma.org)

 

A New Prize in Sound Art

“I feel that the genre of sound art itself might be limiting sound art’s potential,” says artist Ted Apel. “Many sound art shows have the theme of ‘Sound Art.’ Imagine a show of visual art with the theme of ‘Visual Art.’ This would be a laughable idea, but it is something we can’t seem to escape with sound art.”

Apel, who is Lecturer in Electronic Music / Sonic Arts at the New Zealand School of Music at Victoria University of Wellington, was the 2013 winner of the first annual FETA  Prize in Sound Art.

Two years ago in Copenhagen Spencer Topel, Juraj Kojs, and Paula Matthusen hatched the idea for a new prize in sound art. “We sat together and discussed the direction of FETA (Foundation for Emerging Technologies